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Undergraduate Bulletin 1999-2001

Academic Regulations

KNOWLEDGE OF REGULATIONS

Students are responsible for compliance with the regulations of the university and should familiarize themselves with the provisions of this bulletin distributed by the Office of Admissions, the Registration Schedules distributed by the Office of Student Records, the Student Handbook distributed by the Division of Student Affairs, posted official notices and official instructions given to students.

The university reserves the right to clarify and change its regulations in the course of the student's enrollment. Faculty advisors, deans, and associate deans are available to assist students regarding compliance with current regulations. However, it is ultimately the student's responsibility to comply with the regulations and completion of requirements for his or her chosen program of study.

Upon enrollment, the student and the parents or guardians of a dependent student agree that the student will be governed by the university regulations and will abide by decisions made by proper authorities of the university regarding the individual student.

FACULTY ADVISING

All students are advised by faculty members. Faculty are usually assigned to advise students who have indicated an interest in their particular field of specialization. Students may obtain the names of assigned faculty advisors from the office of the dean of their college or from the chair of their department.

Faculty advisors are available to students throughout the academic year, but their role is especially important during the orientation and registration periods. Advisors will help students plan their program, explore career alternatives, and aid in any academic problems. Faculty advisors will also ensure that the undergraduate academic experience is as valuable as possible by assisting students in the sequencing of their course work. Students should be aware, however, that knowledge of and adherence to regulations of Loyola, both academic and otherwise, are the ultimate responsibility of the student.

EARLY REGISTRATION

Currently enrolled students are encouraged to early register for the subsequent term. Graduating seniors and transient students are not eligible to participate in early registration. Specific instructions regarding early registration are printed in the Early Registration Schedules.

If a student decides not to return to the university in the term for which he or she early registered, the student must officially withdraw before the term begins. (See Withdrawal from the University.) Students with financial obligations to the university are subject to having their early registration cancelled according to the promissory note signed with the Office of Student Finance.

REGISTRATION

Registration is held at the beginning of the term for new students and for students enrolled in the previous term who did not participate in early registration. Students who registered early may drop or add at registration.

Those admitted as transient students must complete their credentials during the term of their first admission and thus must be readmitted for the next term as non-degree-seeking students or degree-seeking students in order to continue their enrollment. Students with financial obligations to the university may not register until such obligations have been satisfied.

Please refer to the early registration and registration booklets for additional information.

LATE REGISTRATION

Late registration is normally held for two days after the designated registration period. A late registration fee is assessed, and a student may be required to pay tuition in full. Students with financial obligations to the university may not register until such obligations have been satisfied.

Please refer to the early registration and registration booklets for additional information.

DROP/ADD PERIOD

Deadlines for drop/add activity are strictly enforced. A dropped course is removed from the student's record.

Registration for the audit grading option may be selected by students during any registration activity or the drop/add period and may not be changed at a later date. Please refer to the early registration and registration booklets for additional information.

AUDITING

Students who do not want to earn university credit for a course may elect to audit the course. Such courses are considered part of the student's term course load and are recorded on the transcript. To audit a course, an audit request card signed by the student and his or her advisor must be filed in the student records office before the last day to add classes. Regular tuition and fees apply for audited courses.

A course previously audited may be taken for credit by enrolling in the course in a subsequent term.

A student may not change his or her status from audit to credit nor from credit to audit without permission from his or her advisor. Such approval must be filed in the student records office before the last day to add classes as indicated in the academic calendar for the term.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES

After the drop/add period and up to one week following the mailing of the fall or spring midterm grade reports, students may receive from the registrar an administrative withdrawal from a course. Students receive a W in the course, and the transaction requires the advisor's and instructor's signatures. Course withdrawal is not complete or official until all signatures have been obtained and a copy is filed in the Office of Student Records. Students who stopped attending but do not officially withdraw will receive a grade of F.

Please refer to the early registration and registration booklets for additional information.

REPETITION OF COURSES

Loyola's policy is to show all grades in repeated courses, and the student receives no additional credit hours towards graduation. To determine academic standing, all grades and quality hours are included.

Courses that may be taken more than once as opposed to "repeated" courses (Independent Study, Play Production, etc.) will carry a notation identifying all repeated courses.

GRADUATE COURSES

Subject to the rules of the respective colleges, undergraduates may take one graduate course in each of their last two semesters. The graduate course's earned hours and quality points will be applied to the graduate career only. If students wish to have the graduate credit applied to the undergraduate career, they should petition their dean's office within the first month of class. Under no circumstances will the course's hours and quality points apply to both the graduate and the undergraduate careers.

ATTENDANCE

Each instructor must announce at the beginning of the semester how attendance in class will affect grading. For example, the instructor may judge that attendance in class is imperative and demand adherence to a policy that a student is liable to receive an F at the discretion of the instructor if he or she misses a specified number of the classes. Attendance will not be required on the major religious holidays of any faith.

CLASSIFICATION

DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS are formally admitted to pursue a degree program. Degree-seeking students are classified as follows:

  • Freshmen: 0 - 24 total earned hours
  • Sophomores: 25 - 55 total earned hours
  • Juniors: 56 -89 total earned hours
  • Seniors: 90 or more total earned hours

Failure to attend any term without applying for a leave of absence requires reapplication and readmission to the university.

Classifications are determined by the Office of Admissions based upon the credentials and application submitted by the student.

Classifications may be changed in a student's first term by the admissions office up to November 1 in the fall semester, March 1 in the spring semester, and two weeks after the summer session registration.

NON-DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS are admitted with official credentials but do not wish to pursue a particular degree program. Students admitted as non-degree-seeking must enroll in consecutive terms or apply for a leave of absence in order to maintain their status. Failure to follow these procedures will require an application for readmission. Course work taken while a non-degree-seeking student is subject to evaluation in terms of applicability toward a degree. There are limitations on financial aid available to non-degree-seeking students.

TRANSIENT STUDENTS are admitted for one semester without official credentials. If they wish to continue their enrollment, those who enroll as transient students must apply for admission as non-degree-seeking students or as degree-seeking students by submitting official credentials. Transient students are not eligible to early register. Course work taken while a transient student is subject to evaluation in terms of applicability to a degree. There are limitations on the financial aid available to transient students.

ACADEMIC ENROLLMENT STATUS

Academic Full-time: any undergraduate student enrolled for 12 or more credit hours.

Academic Full-time Per Summer Session: any undergraduate student enrolled for six or more credit hours.

Any undergraduate student not enrolled full-time is considered part-time. Undergraduate students must have their dean's permission to register for more than 20 credit hours (12 hours in City College) in the fall and spring semesters or six credit hours per summer session.

CLASSROOM DISCIPLINE

In the classroom, a student does not have the right to engage in conduct which is disruptive to the educational process. Such conduct (e.g., abusive language, threats, disruptive talking and laughing, violent actions, etc.) may cause removal from that class meeting and can result in removal from the course with a grade of W. A second such disruption may result in exclusion for one or two terms or dismissal from the university.

Appeals Procedure

It is hoped that discipline problems will be resolved either through the mutual agreement of the student and instructor or through the mediation of the department chairperson or the dean of the college.

In case of an appeal, the dean of the college in which the course is offered will decide whether the matter requires consideration. If he or she thinks it does, he or she shall appoint a committee composed of the dean (or a representative), two faculty members and a representative from student affairs. Both the instructor and the student should be apprised of the composition of this committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to the appointed members. After reviewing the evidence, the committee shall render a decision which will be final.

If the dean should refuse to grant a committee hearing, the student has a right to appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of the provost or a representative, two faculty members and a representative from student affairs. Both the instructor and the student should be apprised of the composition of this committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to the appointed members. After reviewing the evidence, the committee shall give a decision which will be final.

INTEGRITY OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADES

The principles of truth and honesty are recognized as fundamental to a community of teachers and scholars. The university expects that both faculty and students will follow these principles and, in so doing, protect the validity of the university grades. Instructors will exercise care in the planning and supervision of academic work so that honest effort will be positively encouraged.

Academic Work

All academic work will be done by the student to whom it is assigned without unauthorized data or help of any kind. A student who supplies another with such data or help is considered deserving of the same sanctions as the recipient. Specifically, cheating, plagiarism and misrepresentation are prohibited. Plagiarism is defined by Alexander Lindley as "the false assumption of authorship: the wrongful act of taking the product of another person's mind, and presenting it as one's own." (Plagiarism and Originality). "Plagiarism may take the form of repeating another's sentences as your own, adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else's argument as your own, or even presenting someone else's line of thinking in the development of a thesis as though it were your own." (MLA Handbook, 1985).

A student who is found to have cheated on any examination may be given a failing grade in the course. In case of a second violation, the student may be excluded for one or two terms or dismissed from the university.

A student who engages in cheating, plagiarism or misrepresentation on term papers, seminar papers, quizzes, laboratory reports and such may receive a sanction of a failing grade in the course. A second offense may be cause for exclusion or dismissal from the university.

Faculty members are required to report immediately to the dean of the student's college any case of cheating, plagiarism or misrepresentation which he or she has encountered and, later, the manner in which it was resolved.

The dean of the student's college should apprise the student of the serious consequences of cheating, plagiarism and misrepresentation as well as of the appeals procedure open to the student in such cases.

Appeals Procedure

If the matter cannot be amicably resolved in consultation with the instructor and chairperson, up to 30 days after the beginning of the subsequent semester, excluding summers, the student has the right to appeal to the dean of the college in which the course was offered a decision of the instructor indicating that the student is guilty of cheating, plagiarism or misrepresentation. The burden of proof will be upon the student.

The dean will decide whether the matter requires consideration. If he or she thinks it does, he or she shall appoint a committee consisting of the dean (or the dean's designated representative), two faculty members and a student to render a decision. The dean or the dean's designated representative will serve as the nonvoting chairperson of the committee. The student and instructor involved should be informed of the membership of the committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection either might have regarding the composition of the committee. The decision of this committee is final.

If the dean should refuse a committee hearing to the student, he or she may appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of the provost or a representative, two faculty members, and one student from the college in which the appellant is enrolled. The decision of this committee is final.

PROCEDURES FOR EXCLUSION OR DISMISSAL

The dean of a college or his or her representative may initiate proceedings for exclusion or dismissal when he or she has reasonable cause to believe that a student has violated a university academic policy or has committed an offense which warrants such action. Grounds for exclusion or dismissal include, but are not limited to, the following: cheating, plagiarism, fraud, misrepresentation and conduct which is disruptive to the educational process (e.g., abusive language, threats, disruptive talking, etc.).

The dean or associate dean will form a committee to hold an exclusion or dismissal hearing. The purpose of the committee is to recommend to the dean any sanctions that should be taken against the student. In the case of fraud, cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation or similar offenses, the committee will consist of the dean (or associate dean), two faculty members and a student from the college in question. In the case of disruptive conduct or other offenses related to the academic environment, the committee will consist of the dean (or associate dean), two faculty members and a representative from student affairs. In the event a committee had been formed to hear an appeal of a second offense, said committee may be convened to act as the hearing committee on exclusion or dismissal. The dean or associate dean of the student's college shall provide the student with a written statement outlining the reasons for the exclusion or dismissal hearing, which is held to consider what action should be taken with regard to the student's future at the university in light of the findings against the student and not to reconsider the student's guilt or innocence in cases of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation, disruptive conduct, etc. The statement shall contain sufficient detail to inform adequately the accused of the time, date, place and conduct serving as the basis for the complaint. The student shall also be advised that he or she has a right to appear before the committee and to present information and witnesses in support of his or her position concerning exclusion or dismissal. Alternatively, the student may present such information in writing. The accused student may make his or her presentation with the assistance of a faculty member, staff member or another student, but legal representation will not be permitted at the hearing.

The hearing on the matter shall be held within a reasonable period of time (normally within 15 days), but at least ten days after the student has received notice of the charges. Until final determination of the matter, the student shall be allowed to continue classes unless, in the opinion of the dean, the violation warrants immediate departure from the university.

Within five days after the hearing, the committee shall make its recommendations to the dean of the student's college. Included in the committee's recommendation shall be a record of the deliberations (a full transcript is not required) and a justification for the committee's decision. A copy of these records shall be immediately forwarded to the provost.

Should the dean of the college decide that the student shall be excluded for one or two semesters or be dismissed from the university, the student may appeal the decision to the provost within ten days following receipt of the dean's decision. After receiving the written appeal from the student, the provost may affirm, modify or reverse the action previously taken by the dean.

The decision of the provost is final. Students from Loyola who have been excluded are not allowed to take course work elsewhere. If they violate this restriction, the transcript may be requested but credit will not be given for the course work nor will the grade point average be used to accept or reject a student who wishes to reenter Loyola. Course work taken after the period of the exclusion will be evaluated. However, the student is advised to follow the procedures for taking courses elsewhere as stated in this bulletin.

GRADING

Each instructor has the option of using a grading method within each course that best meets the needs of the students and the subject. However, all grades are translated by instructors into the following grades:

A Excellent. This grade is assigned 4 quality points per semester hour.
B+ Good. This grade is assigned 3.5 quality points per semester hour.
B Good. This grade is assigned 3 quality points per semester hour.
C+ Average. This grade is assigned 2.5 quality points per semester hour.
C Average. This grade is assigned 2 quality points per semester hour.
D+ Minimally Passing. This grade is assigned 1.5 quality points per semester hour.
D Minimally Passing. This grade is assigned 1 quality point per semester hour.
F Failure or failure to withdraw. No quality points are assigned.
I Incomplete. This grade is to be assigned only when the instructor has been presented with serious and compelling reasons why the student should be allowed to complete the course at a later date. These reasons are customarily medical. The I grade is not an automatic extension. An I grade which has not been made up by the sixth week of the subsequent term, excluding summer terms, will be changed automatically to F.
P Pass. Pass/fail grades are available only in courses designated as pass/fail. Grades of P are not counted toward quality points and quality hours.
W Withdrawal. Indicates that the student withdrew by the 10th week of class in the student records office. No credit is awarded.
AU Audit Complete.
AI Audit Incomplete.
AP Advanced Placement.
IP In Progress.

The use of certain other administrative notations on student grade reports is explained in those reports. Averages are computed only on the basis of letter grades A through F.

GRADE POINT AVERAGES

A student's grade point average is based on credit hours, grading method (pass/fail, etc.), grade awarded and quality points. The following definitions apply.

QUALITY HOURS are the units upon which a student's grade point average is calculated. They differ from earned hours because quality hours do not include the pass grade and do include failed courses.

LOYOLA EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola.

TOTAL EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola as well as the hours awarded for transfer work toward a student's degree.

QUALITY POINTS are calculated by multiplying the quality points associated with a grade (A=4, etc.) by the quality hours. (A 3-credit-hour course with a grade of A will result in 12 quality points.)

GRADE POINT AVERAGES are calculated by dividing the total quality points by the total quality hours.

CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES include only the course work taken at Loyola.

GRADE REPORTS

A report of the grades made by a student in his or her scheduled courses is sent to the student at the end of each term.

Loyola's grade reports list the courses, grades, Loyola grade point averages (both cumulative and semester) and the total earned hours. Discrepancies must be appealed within 30 days of the last examination. (See Grade Appeals.) Grade reports are withheld until all financial indebtedness to the university is satisfied.

CHANGE OF GRADE

An instructor may change a grade previously assigned by processing an official change of grade form in the student records office. The instructor must request the grade change form, cite the reason for changing the grade, and obtain the approval of the dean under whose jurisdiction the course was offered.

GRADE APPEALS

The student has a right to the grade he or she has earned, the right to know the grading system of the instructor and the right to know grades as they are given during the semester. The grading system should be included in the course syllabus.

If the student feels that he or she is not being graded justly, the student should first consult the instructor. If this consultation proves unsatisfactory, the student should then consult the department chairperson. If the student still feels that the problem has not been resolved, he or she should consult the dean of the college in which the course is offered to request a committee hearing.

The student has the right to appeal a given grade to the dean up to 30 days after the beginning of the subsequent semester, excluding summers. It may happen, however, that a hearing may not be able to be scheduled until after that time. Until the grade is finally determined, the student's academic standing and all related rights and privileges are based on the grade as originally assigned.

The student shall collect and present any evidence (tests, papers, laboratory reports, etc.) to the dean. The dean may appoint a committee composed of the dean or the dean's designated representative, two faculty members, who, if possible, should be familiar with the course, and one student who has taken the course, if possible. The dean or the dean's designated representative will serve as the nonvoting chairperson of the committee.

The student and instructor are to be apprised of the composition of the committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection either might have to appointed members. Both the student and the instructor have the right to present their position in person to the committee. The burden of proof will be on the student. The decision of the committee is final, and the grade it decides upon becomes the official grade for the course.

If the dean denies a student a committee hearing, the student may appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of himself or herself or a representative, two faculty members (who should, if possible, be familiar with the course), and one student from the college in which the course is offered and who has taken the course. Both the student and the instructor are to be apprised of the composition of the committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to appointed members. Both the student and the instructor have the right to present their position in person to the committee. The decision of the committee is final, and the grade it decides upon becomes the official grade for the course.

Loyola students enrolled in courses at other institutions are subject to the grade appeal policy at that institution.

ACADEMIC ACTIONS

Probation, Exclusion, and Dismissal

An undergraduate student whose Loyola cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation. In the subsequent semester, the student will be required to make substantial progress toward a Loyola cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. Under normal circumstances, substantial progress is defined as removal of at least one-half of the existing quality point deficiency, with the remainder of the deficiency to be removed in the following term. Failure to make substantial progress during the probationary period may result in the student's exclusion from the university for a minimum of one or two semesters. A student is removed from probation upon achieving a Loyola cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 and upon fulfilling any other probation conditions required by the college.

An undergraduate transfer student who is admitted on probation will be required to make substantial academic progress and to meet specific minimum/maximum credit hour requirements established by the college. Failure to do so during the first semester at Loyola may result in academic exclusion from the university for a minimum of one or two semesters. A transfer student is removed from probation upon fulfilling probation conditions required by the student's college.

Students wishing to return to the university after the period of exclusion must apply for readmission. Readmission in such cases is not automatic and is decided by the dean of the student's college. A mandatory part of the readmission process is an interview with the associate dean, who will, if the student is readmitted, develop a contract with the student for the appropriate curriculum and required progress. Students who reside out of state may substitute a letter to the associate dean in lieu of the interview.

Students from Loyola who have been excluded are not allowed to take course work elsewhere. If they violate this restriction, the transcript may be requested but credit will not be given for the course work nor will the grade point average be used to accept or reject a student who wishes to reenter Loyola. Course work taken after the period of the exclusion will be evaluated. However, the student is advised to follow the procedures for taking courses elsewhere as stated in this bulletin.

All students who have previously been excluded from the university and have been readmitted on probation will be required to make progress as established upon reentry by the associate dean of the student's college. Failure to do so may result in the student being dismissed indefinitely from the university. For readmission after dismissal, refer to the Special Evaluation section of the Admissions chapter of this bulletin.

At the end of each semester, students will be notified by mail by their deans of any academic actions. Academic probation is determined solely by the student's grade point average. Academic actions which result from the student's inability to remove himself or herself from academic probation are made on an individual basis. Academic actions may be appealed to the dean of the student's college. In the spring of 1979, the university ceased indicating a probationary status on a student's transcript; however, the following academic actions do appear on the student's transcript: "academic exclusion for a minimum of one semester," "academic exclusion for a minimum of one year," or "academic dismissal indefinitely."

Students may not graduate while on academic probation.

Dean's List

An undergraduate degree-seeking student enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business Administration, or College of Music who completes 12 quality hours or an undergraduate student enrolled in City College or the College of Business Administration as an evening student who completes nine quality hours may be placed on the Dean's List. To be eligible for this distinction, the student must have earned a 3.5 grade point average with no I or blank grades. Students who are placed on the Dean's List will have this distinction indicated on their transcript at the end of each semester.

CAREERS

Students may have an undergraduate, graduate, joint graduate/professional and/or professional career at Loyola University. Each career has its own grade point average, which will not reflect courses taken that are at a level different from a student's career at that time. Therefore, for students who receive a bachelor's degree and return to take undergraduate courses as a graduate student, their grade point average at the time of the awarding of the undergraduate degree will not be affected by this later course work. In addition, the graduate grade point average will not include quality points for undergraduate courses.

MAJOR

Students indicate an interest in a program of study during the initial admission process which enables the student to be advised properly concerning a course of study. Students may change majors by filing the appropriate change of major form with their college. Should the university in the orderly review of its curriculum decide to discontinue a major, the courses necessary for the completion of the major will be offered in a two-year period.

CHANGE OF COLLEGE OR MAJOR

Students may petition to change their college or major. Students who change their majors must follow the academic program in effect at the time of the change. Students who withdraw from the university or who leave the university without withdrawing and do not return within two semesters must follow the academic program current at the time of their reentry.

DOUBLE MAJOR AND MINOR

Students are allowed to pursue two majors simultaneously by petitioning their dean and establishing one as the major and the other as the second major. Students may also pursue one or two minors. The dean and advisor will establish requirements based on the current bulletin.

SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE

A student who has already been awarded a bachelor's degree may apply for a second degree only if the second degree is different from the first degree. Ordinarily, a second degree at the undergraduate level is discouraged, and a graduate degree is encouraged. However, in rare instances, two baccalaureate degrees may be appropriate to a student's educational goals. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from Loyola University or any other accredited institution may earn a second bachelor's degree from Loyola if they meet the following conditions:

  1. Have the approval of and work out program details with the dean of the college involved;
  2. Complete at Loyola a minimum of 30 additional semester hours beyond the first degree, at least 15 hours of which must be in the second degree's major;
  3. Complete all requirements for the second degree not covered by the first degree program;
  4. Meet all quality point and grade requirements set by the college, including the college's common curriculum requirements.

Students should be aware that financial aid opportunities for those seeking a second baccalaureate degree are limited.

Academic Regulations Continued >>>


1999-2001 Undergraduate Bulletin

Posted online on August 29, 2001