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Classical Studies

CHAIR: T. Davina McClain, Ph.D., Office: 312 Bobet Hall
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: T. Davina McClain, Connie L. Rodriguez
VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Karen Rosenbecker
WEB PAGE: cas.loyno.edu/classical.studies/

Classical studies is at the root of Ignatian education and provides the student with a truly liberal educational experience. The foundations of western civilization, philosophy, religion, art, and culture derive from the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Classical studies examines every area of society in some way and provides the framework and depth that students need to understand and evaluate the present. Whether studying the original languages of Latin or Greek, texts in translation, or the ancient arts and cultures, the student learns to interpret various types of texts and media and thereby develops the ability to understand and analyze the various modes of expression and communication from antiquity. Not only does work in classical studies foster reading and writing skills, but it also sharpens skills in critical thinking and critical analysis. Students will enhance their abilities to analyze complex developments and synthesize materials from numerous sources.

REQUIRED COURSES IN THE MAJOR

The degree program in classical studies consists of 36 credit hours of course work. Each student is required to complete 18 credit hours in one language, Latin or Greek. Students who place into the intermediate or advanced language courses have the option of taking either language courses or courses in classical humanities to satisfy the total of 18 credit hours. The remaining 18 credit hours consist of 15 credit hours of course work from a variety of courses: additional language courses or courses in the literature, history, art and archaeology, culture, and drama of the ancient world. Students may also take courses from other departments (e.g., religious studies, history, philosophy, drama, political science, English, visual arts) with the approval of their adviser and provided that they contain substantial study of the ancient world. The final three credit hours are satisfied through a senior capstone course which allows classical studies majors (and minors with approval of the department) to come together in a detailed study of a topic in the ancient world. The major can be tailored to the student’s needs, whether he/she chooses to attend graduate school, teach at the secondary level, or enter some other area of postgraduate study like medicine or law. Students are encouraged to take a minor in related areas like those mentioned above. The department is especially committed to preparing students to teach Latin on the secondary level to meet the growing need for dedicated middle and high school Latin teachers.

CLASSICAL STUDIES MINOR

The department also offers a classical studies minor. The minor requires 24 credit hours. Twelve hours consist of study in either Latin or Greek and 12 hours of study in additional language courses, classical humanities, or related fields, which are selected by the student and adviser.

THE CLASSICAL STUDIES PORTFOLIO

All majors and minors will develop a portfolio as documentation of their work for the major or minor. Faculty will provide copies of final exams and final papers, and students will be given the opportunity to add additional materials related to their coursework. Once students have reached the advanced level in language study, they will also take sight exams in the appropriate language and these will be placed in the portfolio after the student has had an opportunity to review the exam with his/her adviser. The purpose of these portfolios is to provide both the student and the student’s adviser with a clear view of the student’s progress through the program and to provide the student with an important resource when applying to positions or to graduate study. The portfolio will be housed in the department and will be available to the student at his or her request.

RESOURCES

In conjunction with the departments of history and religious studies, classical studies operates the Humanities Lab, a small computer lab dedicated to teaching with technology and student research in these fields. Software titles specific to classical studies include Latin and Greek tutorials and Perseus 2.0, a database of more than 25,000 images and texts on ancient Greece. With these and other online resources, the department is committed to ensuring that its majors and minors are well prepared for the intellectual and technological challenges of the future.

The department is also the home of the Eta Gamma Chapter of Eta Sigma Phi, the national honorary organization for classical studies. Eligible students are invited to join Eta Sigma Phi in the spring semester.

HONORS

Students wishing to earn departmental honors must have a 3.0 GPA in their major courses. Course work consists of the researching of a thesis under the supervision of a faculty mentor during the spring semester of the junior year and the writing and presentation of the thesis during the fall semester of the senior year. For further information, contact the classical studies chair.

BACHELOR OF ARTS–CLASSICAL STUDIES

Freshman  
F
S
Major A100 — 101 of Language
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
9
   
15
15
   
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major A250*; A300 or A400 of Language
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
6
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
15
   
30
Junior  
F
S
Major A300 or A400 of Language
6
6
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
15
   
30
Senior  
F
S
Major  
6
3
Major CLHU A480
0
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
6
Common Curriculum  
3
3
   
15
15
   
30
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.    

(View A&S Common Curriculum Requirements.)

* A250 if Latin is primary language, A300 — A400 if Greek is primary language.

Updated August 2, 2005