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Communications

CHAIR: Teri K. Henley, M.B.A., Office: 332 Communications/Music Complex
PROFESSOR: A.L. Lorenz
PROFESSOR EMERITUS: John H. Pennybacker
DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE COMMUNICATIONS: David M. Myers, Ph.D.
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: S.L. Alexander, Mary I. Blue, Nancy M. Dupont, William M. Hammel, Teri K. Henley, David M. Myers, Leslie G. Parr, J. Cathy Rogers
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Debra A. Woodfork
EXTRAORDINARY FACULTY:

VISITING PROFESSOR AND CHAIR IN ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS: Robert A. Thomas

INSTRUCTORS: Les J. East, James R. Hashek, Lisa C. Martin, Liz B. Scott

WEB PAGE: cas.loyno.edu/communications/

DEPARTMENT MISSION

The Department of Communications educates students to have a critical understanding and comprehensive body of knowledge of the techniques, theories and social consequences of our complex national and global communications system. In our technologically intense fields in which method and form are major concerns, we educate students to become intellectual, artistic and ethical professional leaders in the rapidly changing information environment.

In the Jesuit tradition, we are committed to understanding and advancing social justice through service to our university, our communities and our disciplines. As scholars, staff, student, and alumni, we value the media as social instruments and are committed to the ethical integration and application of communication skills, knowledge and values in the interconnected and diverse world around us.

STRUCTURE OF THE DEPARTMENT

The Department of Communications offers eight sequences of study: advertising, broadcast journalism, broadcast production, film studies, photojournalism, print journalism, public relations, and communications studies. The communications studies sequence is for those students who wish to design their own curriculum in consultation with their advisers.

Each sequence has communications electives, and this policy reflects the convergence of media in our time; communications professionals often shift from one communications field to another. Thus a journalism student might take courses in public relations, or a broadcast production student might seek out a course in advertising to be better prepared for professional life.

All communications majors take a core of four communications courses: Introduction to Mass Communications, Communications Writing, Mass Communications Theory and Research, and Law of Mass Communications.

The department is also home of the Loyola chair for environmental communications, an endowed professorship whose purpose is to foster comprehension of the difficult process of communicating environmental issues to the public.

FACILITIES

The Department of Communications is housed in an impressive building specifically designed for its purpose. The department’s equipment is outstanding for an undergraduate communications program and represents a sizable investment. Because of the nature of the field, equipment updates are a regular occurrence.

In the broadcast production area, there are two color television studios with modern production control rooms, a master control area, portable television equipment, engineering shop, and radio studios. In addition, there are two new digital studio cameras, four nonlinear editing suites, and digital compositing and three-dimensional graphic/animation on a SGI computer.

For broadcast journalism students, there is a newsroom equipped with computerized news access, the standard of he broadcast news industry. Print journalism students have a new computer network in The Maroon (the student newspaper) office for creating print and online newspapers, and a 20 station Macintosh lab for writing. Photojournalism students have access to a photo darkroom.

Advertising and public relations students have access to state-of-the-art, powerful graphic computers to work on design projects and campaigns. Students interested in advertising and public relations can work on projects for actual clients in the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Non-Profit Communications.

Students in the department work on The Wolf yearbook, Flow magazine, and The Maroon in both print and online edition. Each year a team of students is selected to compete in the American Advertising Federation National Student Competition and the Public Relations Student Society Bateman Competition. Both of these teams have an impressive record of national awards. Loyola’s Film Buffs Institute offers a wide variety of film screenings for class assignments and general interest.

Also housed in the Department of Communications are the Center for Environmental Communications and the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Nonprofit Communications.

AWARDS

Communication students have achieved distinction in numerous national competitions. For example, a graduate won a 1998 Academy Award for the best short non-fiction film. The ad team has won its district award in the American Advertising Federation Competition five out of the past ten years and has also won the National Competition. In recent years, our public relations team has won the annual National Bateman Competition, the premier student public relations competition in the country, more times than any other university in the nation.

The Maroon, our student newspaper, continues to win a large number of awards at the Southeast Journalism Conference. One of our graduates was part of the team that won The New Orleans Times-Picayune’s first Pulitzer Prize.

Broadcast production students and faculty have won awards at the National Association of Broadcasters, the Addy Awards, and numerous other competitions.

INTERNSHIPS

Students can obtain credit for supervised internships in any of the media or at agencies. Many media companies contact the Department of Communications for interns, and these openings are posted on the internship board in the department. Some students secure an internship on their own, and they can also receive credit provided the internship meets the standards listed in the department’s Guide to Internships.

PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC SOCIETIES

The department holds memberships in the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication, Broadcast Education Association, Louisiana Association of Broadcasters, the American Advertising Federation, and Public Relations Society of America. Student organizations include Kappa Tau Alpha, the national honor society in journalism and mass communications; Society of Professional Journalists; Advertising Club; Public Relations Student Society of America; and Radio and Television News Directors Association.

FACULTY

The makeup of the faculty reflects the philosophy of the department: a group of professors and instructors who combine doctoral degrees with years of professional experience.

CURRICULUM

Total number of hours required: 120
Communications hours required: 33

Required courses:

 

CMMN A100 Introduction to Mass Communications
CMMN A101 Communications Writing
CMMN A400 Mass Communications Theory and Research
CMMN A401 Law of Mass Communications

Sequences:

In addition to completing the core requirements, each student must complete a coherent sequence of courses established by the department for a particular communications field. Sequences include advertising, broadcast production, broadcast journalism, print journalism, public relations, photojournalism, communications studies, and film studies.

Graduation Requirements:

Majors in communications must have a minimum 2.0 GPA in communications courses in order to graduate.

Minors in communications must have at least a 2.0 GPA in communications courses in order to graduate with a minor in communications.

General Requirements:

Any student wishing to take an advanced communications course must have at least a C in CMMN A101.

MINORS

Each communications major must also complete a minor, a set of courses in another field of study outside the department. Requirements for minors are specified elsewhere in this bulletin.

TYPING REQUIREMENT

All communications students must have word processing experience.

BACHELOR OF ARTS–COMMUNICATIONS

Freshman
F
S
Major
CMMN A100 — A101
3
3
Common Curriculum
9
9
Foreign Language
3
3
 
15
15
 
30
Sophomore
F
S
Major
(Sequence Entry Courses)
3
3
Minor
3
3
Common Curriculum
6
6
Adjunct/Electives
0
3
 
12
15
 
27
Junior
F
S
Major
CMMN A400, A401, (Sequence)
6
6
Minor
6
6
Common Curriculum
6
6
 
18
18
 
36
Senior
F
S
Major
6
3
Minor
3
3
Common Curriculum
3
3
Adjunct/Electives
3
3
 
15
12
   
27
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.
 

(View A&S Common Curriculum Requirements.)

LIMITS

  1. No more than 42 hours in communications courses may be counted toward the 120 hours required for the degree.

  2. Only three hours of internship may be counted toward the 120 hours required for the degree.

  3. No communications course offered in the Common Curriculum (CMMN W or X130 — CMMN 199) may be used to meet major requirements for a degree or to meet Common Curriculum requirements.

Specific Common Curriculum requirements are given in the beginning of this chapter under Curriculum Design. Refer to A&S Common Curriculum in the index for page number.

Updated August 2, 2005