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Philosophy

CHAIR: Patrick L. Bourgeois, Ph.D., Office: 442 Bobet Hall
WEB PAGE: cas.loyno.edu/philosophy/

Philosophy plays a unique role in liberal education. It challenges students both to reflect on their own biases and presuppositions and to put order into their thoughts. It also teaches the student to reflect critically on the presuppositions and beliefs of all other disciplines. As such, philosophy is an essential dimension of liberal education.

Philosophy reflects on human experience in its most general aspects, seeks meaning and connections that elude more specialized or less reflective disciplines, and confronts human values precisely as values. It probes the basis of ethical judgment and subjects moral criteria to critical evaluation and reflection.

Attempting to overcome the tendency in education to narrow specializations and the limitation to career training belongs to the very nature of philosophy. Such overspecialization dulls the student’s sense of possibilities beyond the narrowed scope of a limited specialized field. It can lead to sacrificing the individual to social functions. By alerting students to the dangers of overspecialization, philosophy liberates and humanizes them.

Although philosophy is an autonomous discipline and independent of theology, philosophers have often raised the questions which most preoccupy theologians. Creative philosophers have in every age provided the vocabulary for innovative theological thought.

The following courses are required for a major in philosophy: nine hours from logic, epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics; nine hours from ancient philosophy, medieval philosophy, modern philosophy, and contemporary philosophy; and the senior research seminar. These required courses are offered every year. The normal requirements in credit hours for a major in philosophy are 33 to 36 hours. Philosophy electives for the major are offered on a continuous and rotational basis.

BACHELOR OF ARTS–PHILOSOPHY

Freshman  
F
S
Major PHIL Systematic Sequence1
3
0
Foreign Language3  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
9
   
15
15
   
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major PHIL Systematic Sequence1
3
0
Major PHIL Historical Sequence2
0
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
9
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
18
   
33
Junior  
F
S
Major PHIL Historical Sequence2
3
3
Major PHIL Electives/PHIL Systematic Sequence1
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
Adjunct/Electives  
6
5
   
18
17
   
35
Senior  
F
S
Major PHIL Electives
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
9
Senior Research Seminar  
3
0
   
15
15
   
30
TOTAL: 128 cr. hrs.  

(View A&S Common Curriculum Requirements.)

Specific Common Curriculum requirements are given in the beginning of this chapter under Curriculum Design. Refer to A&S Common Curriculum in the index for page number.

1 Systematic Sequence: choose nine hours from A206, A210, A215, and A220.
2 Historical Sequence: choose nine hours from A400, A405, A410, and contemporary.
3 Students who wish to be recommended for graduate studies in philosophy must either manifest a reading knowledge in a foreign language or successfully complete 12 credit hours in one of the following: Greek, Latin, German, French, or Russian.

Updated August 2, 2005